Hiking, Waterfalls & Excursions

Hikes

Hiking to the world's second-largest boiling lake is one of the best experiences in Dominica, but it's also one of the most demanding hikes on the island. Unless you are very familiar with the terrain, it is highly recommended to hire a guide ahead of time to accompany you. Below is a list of experienced guides who will not only make your journey to the lake safer but will also provide you with tons of interesting information about the local flora, fauna, and wildlife you'll find along the trail.


Boeri Lake
Boeri Lake

An hour and half "intermediate" hike will lead you into the heart of the rainforest of the Morne Trois Piton National Park.

There you will find a fascinating variety of trees, plants and shrubs. With a view of the falls in the distance, you will feel a cool spray of water on your body.

The falls are striking, with a narrow stream dropping about 200 ft. from a keyhole notch in the lip of the cliff. The pool beneath the falls is swimmable, though a bit chilly!


Fresh Water Lake
Fresh Water Lake

Freshwater Lake requires a steep climb but the views are worth it. You'll need to hike to this lake, the island's largest but it won't be lonely. Hundreds of hummingbirds can be seen along the way. It is beautiful spot in which to cool off since it's at a higher elevation. There are opportunities for breathtaking views, beautiful hikes, kayaking and a bar is open at peak times. Hiking boots or appropriate footwear is recommended 


Morne Diablotins
Morne Diablotins

Morne Diablotins National Park is a national park in the northern mountain ranges of the island. The park covers 8,242 acres, and was established in 2000, primarily to protect the habitat of the endangered Sisserou Parrot, the national symbol of Dominica. The park is home to 4,747 foot Morne Diablotins, the tallest mountain on the island and the second highest mountain in the Lesser Antilles. 


Morne Aux Diables
Morne Aux Diables

This excellent but strenuous walk takes you across Morne aux Diables, a mountain that dominates the very north end of the island soaring 2,826 ft. Though this volcanic mountain is dormant, you will see active sulphur springs along the way. The trail traverses the northern tip of the Island from Tanetane on the northwest coast near Portsmouth, to Vieille Case on the northeast coast.  


Chaudiere Pool
Chaudiere Pool

Chaudiere is a beautiful, natural pool carved out of grey rock, fed by a calmly cascading downpour from the river above. This refreshing swimming hole emanates from the Hampstead River in the picturesque community of Bense. The pool is the perfect way to escape from the surrounding heat and be embraced by nature. Thick forest hovers above and fresh river millets can be seen jumping up the tumbling waterfall. Jump in from cliffside and be caressed by calm river torrents in yet another one of Dominica's fresh water wonders.



Waterfalls

Sari Sari
Sari Sari

Sari-Sari Falls is located on the east coast within the village of La Plaine, and starts with a steep incline to the bed of the Sari-Sari River. The trail traverses along the river bed, crossing several times. The exact path you travel depends on the flow of the river. Care must be taken as the trail can be slippery when wet. Sari-Sari is a beautiful waterfall, but most of its appeal is its location on the remote Atlantic side of the island.


Jacko Falls is one of Dominica's most breathtaking waterfalls, known for its impressive height, stunning beauty, and tranquil setting. Located in the heart of the rainforest, Jacko Falls is a must-see destination for anyone visiting the island.

To reach the falls, visitors must take a short, scenic hike through the lush tropical rainforest. As they approach the falls, they will be greeted by the sound of cascading water and the refreshing mist in the air. The waterfall drops over 200 feet into a stunning pool below, surrounded by lush vegetation and towering trees.

Swimming in the cool, clear pool beneath Jacko Falls is an experience like no other. Visitors can relax in the tranquil waters and feel the power of the falls as they wash over them. The area around the falls is a natural paradise, with a diverse range of plant and animal life to discover.

Emerald Pool
Emerald Pool

Emerald Pool is not to be missed when traveling to Dominica. Fed by the clear mountain water rushing from a 40 foot waterfall, the pool's waters appear emerald green in the leafy, filtered sunlight. Its color and drama have served as the backdrop of several movies as well as weddings.

Located in Morne Trois Piton National Park, Emerald Pool is surrounded by verdant forest and offers swimmers and waders a cooling respite on humid days. Just ten minutes off the interior Roseau-Castle Bruce Road, it's the most accessible waterfall in the UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Don't miss your chance to experience the pleasures that Emerald Pool has offered its guests for thousands of years.


Trafalgar Falls
Trafalgar Falls

These famous twin waterfalls are a 20-minute drive from Roseau. It's a short 10 to 15 minute walk along a well-maintained path to the viewing platform, where you can photograph both falls.

As you walk the path, be sure to stop at the warm spring that flows across the trail. The more daring can continue on to swim in the refreshing waters of the smaller waterfall or find the hot springs of the tallest fall

Syndicate Falls is a waterfall in the Syndicate plantation area of northern Dominica. The falls are on the way to Syndicate nature trail and the trailhead to Morne Diablotins peak and the Northern Forest Reserve.

Middleham Falls
Middleham Falls

This trail in the World Heritage Site takes you past hot and cold springs gushing from the side of Morne Macaque, past crystal clear streams, through old gardens and montane forest. The lake sits at an elevation of 2,800 ft and covers some four acres. It is located in the crater of an old volcano in which Morne Macaque (also known locally as Morne Micotrin) was formed, separating Boeri from Freshwater Lake. Boeri Lake is almost circular in shape and at least 117 ft deep. Fed by rainfall and runoff, the water level varies with the seasons, reaching its highest point between October and December. Walk up the ridge to Boeri Lake for some superb panoramic views of Dominica. The hike to Boeri Lake begins at Freshwater Lake and is a moderate 1-1/4 mile walk. The path is rocky and can be slippery, especially in the rain.


The short swim from a swimming hole through a narrow gorge to a powerful waterfall is charmingly spooky; it's dark down there with steep vine-clad lava walls no more than 5ft or 7ft apart. It's an ethereal and unusual place, but can get crowded. If there's a cruise ship in port, come early or late in the day for relative serenity.

The name, by the way, is Creole for 'small throat.' Don't swim the gorge after heavy rains when dangerous flash flooding may occur. Scenes from Pirates of the Caribbean were filmed here.


Excursions

Red Rock
Red Rock

These attractively hued rocks make up a dramatic headland that enjoys a fabulous position overlooking two bays. There's not much to do here but enjoy the views and clamber around the rocks, but it's pleasant enough if you're in the area. 

Scotts Head Point
Scotts Head Point

A narrow isthmus separating the fierce Atlantic and the calm Caribbean leads to Scotts Head, the rocky headland named for an 18th-century British lieutenant governor. A short hike leads up to a smattering of ruins, the remnants of the fort he erected in defense of Soufriere Bay. There's great snorkeling off the pebbly beach, and a bar that rents gear and serves cold drinks.

The point also marks the beginning of the Waitukubuli National Trail.

Indian River Tours
Indian River Tours

Be transported in minutes from the urban environment of the town of Portsmouth to the warm embrace of nature by taking a tour up the scenic Indian River.

The Indian River got its name because Kalinago (Carib Indian) lived along its banks and used it as an access route to the Caribbean Sea. The river was important to their livelihood as they used it to transport goods for trade with sailors and along the island chain.



Sulphur Spa
Sulphur Spa

A little way's inland from Roseau and enveloped by tropical forest is the tiny village of Wotten Waven. Popular with Dominicans and travelers alike, Wotten Waven is well-known for its natural hot sulfur springs and mud pools that are believed to have medicinal qualities.

Regardless of their actual healing powers, the hot springs offer a relaxing and reviving experience after a long day hiking the Waitukubuli National Trail. There's no better natural medicine to soothe sore muscles — or calm jittery nerves — than by settling into the spring's naturally muddy water.

Enterprising local villagers have created spas where health hunters and nature seekers can wallow in open-air pools surrounded by lovely gardens. Some stay open after sunset, allowing you to chill under the stars, drinks and snacks in hand, and be serenaded by tree frogs. Each spa has its own special charm and amenities, from private sulphur baths and mud pools to exotic gardens and local culinary delights.


Horseback Riding
Horseback Riding

To experience the Nature Island on horseback is truly a step back in time.

Ride through pristine rainforest. Swim with your horse in the unspoiled Prince Rupert Bay. Encounter an endless array of wild and cultivated tropical flowers, ornamental plants and exotic fruit trees. Discover cultural and historical sites across the island from the best vantage point imaginable.

Dominica's mountain trails weave through one of the world's last remaining oceanic rain forests where nature truly comes alive. Saddle up! There's so much to see.


Botanical Garden
Botanical Garden

The largest area of green space within the City of Roseau, this 40 acre oasis is home to over 50 types of indigenous plants and imported trees as well as the Sisserou Parrot, the National Bird of Dominica. Look for hurricane David's "signature" – the twisted remains of a large bus crushed beneath a massive Baobab Tree.
"The Gardens" continue to be the idyllic setting for recreation, parades and celebrations, and its beauty and serenity make it one of the true gems of the Caribbean. 

Whale Watching
Whale Watching

Dominica's sheer underwater drop-offs create deep sheltered bays along its western coastline–the perfect haven for the Sperm Whale to breed and calve.

Dominica is the only country in the world where the sperm whale resides all year long, although sightings are most common between November and March. Just a short boat ride brings you into contact with the world's largest toothed animal in the calm turquoise Caribbean Sea.

Boaters and fishermen report seeing the sperm whale at Scotts Head, Roseau, Layou, and Point Round. Whale watching operators follow strict codes of conduct, minimizing any disturbance, and never "luring" the whales. On the rare occasion when the whales may be elusive, you're sure to see the acrobatics of hundreds of Spotted and Spinner Dolphins.

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